How To Steal Like An Artist

edited April 2011 in The Toolbox
The "Toolbox" category is looking awfully lonely there, without any post in it.  So here's something.

A month or so ago an article called "How to Steal Like An Artist (And 9 Other Things Nobody Told Me)" started doing the rounds.  I think it's pretty damn great.

My favorite part (to the point that the image attached is now the lock screen on my iPhone):

The secret: do good work and put it where people can see it



6. The secret: do good work and put it where people can see it.



I get a lot of e-mails from young artists who ask how they can find an audience. “How do I get discovered?”


I sympathize with them. There was a kind of fallout that happened when I left college. The classroom is a wonderful, if artificial place: your professor gets paid to pay attention to your ideas, and your classmates are paying to pay attention to your ideas.


Never in your life will you have such a captive audience.


Soon after, you learn that most of the world doesn’t necessarily care about what you think. It sounds harsh, but it’s true. As Steven Pressfield said, “It’s not that people are mean or cruel, they’re just busy.”


If there was a secret formula for getting an audience, or gaining a following, I would give it to you. But there’s only one not-so-secret formula that I know: “Do good work and put it where people can see it.”


It’s a two step process.


Step one, “do good work,” is incredibly hard. There are no shortcuts. Make stuff every day. Fail. Get better.


Step two, “put it where people can see it,” was really hard up until about 10 years ago. Now, it’s very simple: “put your stuff on the internet.”

Comments

  • Step two, “put it where people can see it,” was really hard up until about 10 years ago. Now, it’s very simple: “put your stuff on the internet.”

    Amend that to "put your stuff on the internet in the same place regularly and frequently".

    Without consistency of delivery there will be no audience to build on let alone an audience at all. Further, there's the signal to noise ratio isn't particularly friendly.  You may bring quality on schedule, but without consistent promotion outside the work itself you may end up never finding an audience of any sort.


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